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Faith Blog
Old Blog
Reblogged from feministavegana  131 notes
itmovesmemorelol:

This simple rainwater-harvesting system will put the water where your plants need it most. ILLUSTRATION: ELAYNE SEARS
A Better Rainwater-Harvesting System  
 Think beyond the rain barrel: This simpler, cheaper approach to rainwater harvesting will help you harvest much more water for your garden! 

By Cheryl Long
Harvesting rainwater to use for growing vegetables makes a great deal of sense. Unfortunately, the most common method of rainwater harvesting isn’t the most effective. Typically, gardeners invest in a rain barrel — which holds only 50 or 60 gallons of water — and then dole out the captured water to plants as needed, hopefully emptying the barrel before the next storm.
But 50 gallons is only a small fraction of the water you could be harvesting each time it rains. During a 1-inch shower, more than 900 gallons of water flow off the roof of a 30-by-50-foot house or barn. Instead of catching just a little bit of it in a rain barrel, why not capture it all? You can do just that with a simple setup that diverts rain from your downspouts directly to your garden. We’ll tell you more about how to do this in a minute, but first, we’ll explain why we think it’s such a good idea.
How Soil Stores Water
Even many experienced gardeners have trouble comprehending just how much water soil can hold. Except in areas with consistently high rainfall, your garden soil’s moisture level will seldom be at “field capacity.” That’s the term scientists use to describe the maximum amount of water a soil can hold. When it rains or when we irrigate, gravity pulls the water down into the soil. After a heavy rain, some of the water may move all the way down to the water table or the bedrock, but a large amount of it is held by capillary forces that cause water to coat each soil particle and partially fill the spaces between particles. (An example of capillary action is the way a paper towel absorbs liquid.) That capillary water is what your crops use as they grow.
Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/rainwater-harvesting-zm0z12aszhun.aspx#ixzz2xIYlPCOa
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☽✪☾ The Dance at Alder Cove - Youth/Father/Geezer  -  I see you
 


//

itmovesmemorelol:

This simple rainwater-harvesting system will put the water where your plants need it most. ILLUSTRATION: ELAYNE SEARS

A Better Rainwater-Harvesting System

Think beyond the rain barrel: This simpler, cheaper approach to rainwater harvesting will help you harvest much more water for your garden!

By Cheryl Long

Harvesting rainwater to use for growing vegetables makes a great deal of sense. Unfortunately, the most common method of rainwater harvesting isn’t the most effective. Typically, gardeners invest in a rain barrel — which holds only 50 or 60 gallons of water — and then dole out the captured water to plants as needed, hopefully emptying the barrel before the next storm.

But 50 gallons is only a small fraction of the water you could be harvesting each time it rains. During a 1-inch shower, more than 900 gallons of water flow off the roof of a 30-by-50-foot house or barn. Instead of catching just a little bit of it in a rain barrel, why not capture it all? You can do just that with a simple setup that diverts rain from your downspouts directly to your garden. We’ll tell you more about how to do this in a minute, but first, we’ll explain why we think it’s such a good idea.

How Soil Stores Water

Even many experienced gardeners have trouble comprehending just how much water soil can hold. Except in areas with consistently high rainfall, your garden soil’s moisture level will seldom be at “field capacity.” That’s the term scientists use to describe the maximum amount of water a soil can hold. When it rains or when we irrigate, gravity pulls the water down into the soil. After a heavy rain, some of the water may move all the way down to the water table or the bedrock, but a large amount of it is held by capillary forces that cause water to coat each soil particle and partially fill the spaces between particles. (An example of capillary action is the way a paper towel absorbs liquid.) That capillary water is what your crops use as they grow.


/|\

☽✪☾
The Dance at Alder Cove - Youth/Father/Geezer  I see you

 

Reblogged from purple0black0star  843 notes
  • 1:

    what have you been diagnosed with, (and possibly self diagnosed with)?

  • 2:

    what will you tend to do at nights, when you can't sleep?

  • 3:

    worst experience/side effects of a medication?

  • 4:

    how has your condition impacted your mental health?

  • 5:

    describe your social life

  • 6:

    hardest thing to do when you are flaring?

  • 7:

    your worries for the future?

  • 8:

    favourite comfort food?

  • 9:

    tell us a valuable lesson you have learnt, through being unwell?

  • 10:

    name 3 things that you miss, taken from health limitations?

  • 11:

    how old were you when you started noticing symptoms?

  • 12:

    biggest injustice about living with a chronic illness?

  • 13:

    worst advice you have been given about your health?

  • 14:

    what items, related to illness, could you not cope without?

  • 15:

    can you remember being pain free?

  • 16:

    do you know anyone in real life who shares your condition?

  • 17:

    one symptom you would love not to have?

  • 18:

    lovely things said to you and something ignorant/negative, about being sick?

  • 19:

    are your family supportive, or mostly ignorant to your suffering?

  • 20:

    describe the feeling after walking up/down stairs

  • 21:

    any natural supplements, powders or alternative treatments you would recommend others try?

  • 22:

    what is the biggest thing you would like people to understand about your illness?